Instructions for Abstracts and Posters

Before beginning, you should be prepared to copy and paste your title, subject area and abstract into our form.

  1. Abstracts should stay within 250 words.
  2. Try not to use special characters, as they may not be read properly by our online form.
  3. If you are presenting with a team, you should be prepared with the college and major of all presenters.
  4. You must login with your CruzID Blue here to submit.
  5. BSOE Poster Printing Guidelines

For some guidance on writing an effective abstract see this video http://vimeo.com/3968357

For questions or problems, please contact vschlege@ucsc.edu or boisvert@ucsc.edu.

THIS IS HOW YOUR ABSTRACT WILL APPEAR IN BOOKLET

A NOVEL METHOD TO MOBILIZE STEM CELLS FOR TRANSPLANTATION IN CANCER THERAPIES
Herman Tsang
Faculty Mentor: Camilla E Forsberg
A crucial procedure in transplantation therapy is mobilizing hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from the bone marrow niche to the peripheral blood for harvest. For patients with cancers of the blood or bone marrow and no response to chemotherapy, the common mobilization procedure using the granulocyte-colony stimulating factor poses two challenges: the prolonged treatment requires four to six days, and it does not elicit a response in every patient in need of immediate treatment. However, AMD3100, a small-molecule antagonist of the CXCR4 transmembrane receptor, has recently been shown to induce acute mobilization within hours. In previous studies, our research group showed that two receptors CXCR4 and Robo4 cooperate to mediate homing of HSCs from the peripheral blood to the bone marrow.

In this study, we demonstrate that the Slit2 protein, the putative ligand of the Robo4 surface receptor, in combination with AMD3100, more effectively mobilizes HSCs and progenitors from the bone marrow and into the peripheral blood than does AMD3100 alone. In treatments with Slit2 in combination with AMD3100, marked increases in the numbers of multipotent progenitors and common myeloid progenitors in the peripheral blood indicate more effective mobilization, and a marked increase in the number of HSCs in the peripheral blood confirms the roles of CXCR4 and Robo4 in the homing of HSCs. We propose that co-mobilization by Slit2 and AMD3100 potentially provides a safer and more effective alternative to common mobilization procedures in treatments for cancers of the blood and bone marrow.